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Biophilia Survey Results - Part Two

Survey Results – Part 2 – The Herbal Treatment

Part 2 presented the results regarding which nature-based activities herbalists use in their treatment plans and how they talk about herbs with their patients. Additionally, it looked at how practitioners encouraged their patients in nature-based activities but also which limitations their patients experienced in engaging with them.

Respondents were asked how often they gave a patient a herb tea to drink regularly, how often they told their patients which herbs were in their prescriptions and how often they asked their patients to incorporate foraged herbs into their diets.

96% of respondents gave their patients a tea to drink regularly, with only 4% doing so rarely or never.

94% of respondents answered the question regarding telling patients which herbs are in their prescriptions, with the majority of those (67%) telling their patients all of the time.

And 94% of respondents answered the question regarding asking patients to incorporate foraged herbs into their diets, with the majority (54%) asking their patients to do so some of the time, 2% asking their patients all of the time and 27% asking rarely or never.

Survey respondents were then asked whether, and in what ways, they engaged their patients in nature-based activities as part of their treatment plan.

84% of respondents encouraged their patients to engage in nature-based activities, with walking or hiking (92%), gardening (75%) and foraging (52%) being the most popular choices of activity. Interestingly, these were also the most popular choices of nature-based activity amongst practitioners as part of their self-care routines.

Other outdoor activities that respondents asked patients to engage in included outdoor or nature-based meditations (47%), wild water swimming (15%), and camping and wild camping (7%). Creative and environmental activities were also encouraged, such as plant drawing and nature art (12%), plant or landscape photography (9%) and environmental volunteering (8%). Themes emerging from other activities mentioned were ‘grounding’ and barefoot walking (4 mentions), plant and wildlife connection (4 mentions) as well as stargazing and acknowledging moon phases (2 mentions).

10% of survey respondents did not encourage patients to engage in nature-based activities as part of their treatment plan, with 4% having not considered it and 6% stating that patients were either already doing so, were too busy to do so, or needed to actually do less to achieve recovery.

Respondents were asked whether they had encountered any limitations or challenges in engaging patients in nature-based activities.

36% of respondents replied that they had not experienced any limitations or challenges.

Of the 64% who had experienced these, lack of time was considered the main constraint (81%), followed by lack of interest (61%), access to nature (44%) and disability or mobility issues (43%). Furthermore, 20% of respondents identified patient apprehension of spending time in nature as a limitation, and 2% of respondents identified their own lack of confidence in suggesting nature-based activities as a limitation.

View part 3 of the survey results and summary here!